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Inside lagos | The slave port

Last Saturday I went on a picnic / mini tour with a group of ladies and we visited the slave port in badagry.

We started off by visiting the barracoon of the renowned slave trader Seriki Williams Abass, it was really an eye opener I learnt facts I didn’t know about the slave trade era.


I don’t think anyone can ever visit the barracoon and not be moved to tears .

The barracoon consisted of two small rooms with little ventilation and barely any natural light for male and female slaves, each room would be filled with at least forty slaves, some of the women gave birth to their babies in the room and of course some of the slaves died before even being sold to their new owners because of the living conditions.

Ankle shackles used to restrict the slaves

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The most annoying thing was the trade by barter system being used to trade slaves at the time.
European products used for battering slaves

For instance a mirror was payment for ten slaves and a dane gun was given in return for forty slaves.And an umbrella was payment for hundred slaves.

It’s sad to note that although the slave trade has been abolished, we humans still place more importance on material things over building a relationship amongst ourselves.
After we left the barracoon we visited the first storey building in Nigeria, its amazing how the building is still sturdy with almost everything still intact.

The first storey building was built by Anglican missionaries, I did not even know that Bishop Samuel Ajayi Crowther used to be a slave until he was liberated by one of the Christian missionaries.


In case you don’t know, Bishop Samuel Ajayi Crowther translated the Bible from English to Yoruba.
 
 
 
 
 
 
We rounded up by visiting the Agia tree monument where Christianity was first preached and where the first Christmas was held.

In all I realised that the best things in life are truly free, I am grateful to be born in this generation and also for freedom and liberation, our forefathers paid a dear price for it.
The agia tree monument


In all I realised that the best things in life are truly free, I am grateful to be born in this generation and also for freedom and liberation, our forefathers paid a dear price for it.
And of course a few fun pictures from me.




I hope you found this post helpful. Share your thoughts in the comment section, what do you know about the slave trade era? Have visited the slave port before?
Till next time 😘😘 thanks for stopping by.
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skinnybrowny

Hi there , my name is Vivian (popularly known as skinnybrowny) the brain behind this litttle space.
I am a creative thinker with vast interests and talents , I am my own biggest competition and critic ,everyday I Strive to be a better version of myself.
I aim is to educate/enlighten everyone who stops by through my skills and ability. I hope you to stay and grow with me.

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0 Comments

  1. This is a really wonderful and eye opening post from you my dear blogger. Please promote it more

    1. Thanks dear.. I appreciate the feedback

  2. I never knew of the Agia tree monument until now. Thank you.
    I’ve never been to the slave port before. Perhaps someday when I’m in Lagos.
    I love this ” It’s sad to note that although the slave trade has been abolished, we humans still place more importance on material things over building a relationship amongst ourselves.”.
    Good post.
    http://Www.debby000.WordPress.com

    1. And that ankle shackle!

      1. Imagine working in that for hours.

    2. Thanks for stopping by.. Glad you learnt a thing or two.

  3. Ojo Folakemi says:

    The slave port story is really touching.
    Thanks for sharing and I must say, nice pictures you gt there.

  4. Ojo Folakemi says:

    The slave port story is really touching.
    Thanks for sharing and I must say, nice pictures you gt there.

    1. Thanks love

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